February 4, 2009

Fashionable Flu masks

flu masksDonning a flu mask is a great way to protect yourself from flu, influenza or pandemics like SARS, Bird Flu/Avian flu. In a world-first clinical trial of the efficacy of masks, researchers found adult mask wearers in the home were four times more likely than non-wearers to be protected against respiratory viruses, including the common cold. Professor MacIntyre says: "There is no effective treatment for the 90 or so common cold viruses that make families sick each winter, but masks could provide simple and effective protection."

But fashion freaks can’t bear to be frumpish and un-chic, even during a pandemic. That’s why, sometime back New Yorker Patricia Lamberti created Fashion Flu Masks that the U.S centres for Disease control and Prevention recommend to help keep airborne viruses at bay. Additionally, it could be used while doing home-improvement projects too. Lamberti had adorned them with sequins, floral appliqu├ęs, leopard fabrics, satin ribbons colourful fabric, and even fuzz ball. Don’t know for sure, if these masks are still available, as her site www.fashionflumasks.com has been taken off.

Alternatively you may consider this EnviroAir Designer Mask. It has passed 100% of all NIOSH (National Institute for occupational Safety and Health) requirements. What’s more, it has features like Anti-Microbial Liner, Contoured nose pad and adjustable strap for comfort, earplugs to tune out noise, an Eye-Flap that blocks out all light for sleeping along with a “Do Not Disturb” sign to prevent unwanted disruption while sleeping, aromatic eucalyptus oil ( Eucalyptus has been shown to have anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and decongesting properties, and its oil has been used traditionally to treat asthma, nasal congestion, runny nose, cough, sore throat, sinusitis and other respiratory conditions; in fact a major ingredient of eucalyptus oil relieves inflammation of the sinuses (sinusitis), according to a study published in Laryngoscope.) to soothe your senses and reusable Vinyl Pouch for easy travel. Not only that, this incredible mask has a beauty use as well as its eye-flap also has a pocket filled with cooled Gel-Compress which is a wonderful way to relieve eye-muscle tension and puffy eyes, while seeking protection from an epidemic. Could you ask for more?

You may also choose from these NIOSK approved N95 masks; most of them are easily available at Amazon. They are not as trendy or chic as the above mentioned masks but provide adequate protection against deadly flu/SARS/Avian flu virus. These respirators are believed to filter out at least 95 percent of airborne particles during testing using a "most-penetrating" sized particle of 0.3 microns. Research also indicates that n95 respirators provide higher protection than a standard surgical mask.
On the other hand, manufacturers and distributors of the so-called nanomask claim that their masks do better than N95 masks due to a coating that reacts to contaminants at the mask surface. According to them electric charges within the nanoparticle coating and among a contaminant react, rendering the contaminant inactive. Though it is not yet rated by NIOSK, Nelson Laboratories in Salt Lake City (registered under the Food and Drug Administration) has tested the product and found it is 99.99 percent effective at filtering particles as small as 0.027 microns.Nanomask manufacturers proclaim on their website that as N95 masks are not effective against any particulate, virus, or bacteria smaller than .3 microns, it’s a waste of money if one buys an N95 mask for the purpose of blocking H5N1 or any influenza virus as it gives one a false sense of security. Michael Zimring, director of the Wilderness and Travel Medicine Center at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore, however adds: "Masks may offer people a security blanket. But just putting on a mask isn't going to do it. You have to do everything else, too. Keep your hands clean, stay hydrated and get enough rest."



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4 comments:

  1. Where's fashionable wearing flu masks?lol..it's ok not to be fashionable wearing it, than spreading sickness. That's not fashionable then.lol.

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  2. Anonymous10:38 AM

    They may look nice, but taking a functioning mask and dying it and gluing things all over it renders it absolutely useless against any airborne nastiness. You'll look cute, but you'll get sick.

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  3. Anonymous10:48 AM

    The intended purpose of the mask is to protect the wearer from allergens, pollens and airborne microbes/contaminants that could be detrimental to the individual’s health. The mask also filters unpleasant odors as well as providing a glove like barrier for the respiratory system in cold weather.

    The mask may be washed based on personal hygiene needs, and the extent of ones own personal ENT excretions. It is recommended that the mask be hand-washed in a mild detergent and air-dried. Replacement would also be based on hygiene and careful maintenance. When visible deterioration of the sewn in filter becomes apparent the mask should be replaced. A person of normal facial excretions, proper care, and regular disposable filer replacement could expect to use the mask on a regular basis for 1 year or longer.

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  4. I wish more people in the U.S. would wear cold and flu masks. It is just not the thing to do here, yet it makes a lot of sense. I would love to be able to don a flu mask when some of my piano students come in with bad colds. The parents who are the worst offenders in sending their children in sick are those in the medical or nursing profession.

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