February 18, 2007

Drinking milk may not give you strong bones

Bones constantly take up and release calcium throughout life – in both, men and women. However, post-menopausal women are more susceptible to osteoporosis or brittle-bone disease because declining estrogen levels impair the skeleton’s calcium retaining ability. So the most common advice offered to women is to eat plenty of calcium-rich food, particularly, milk and milk-products.

But, before gulping down glasses of milk in your eagerness to replenish your depleting calcium levels, have a look at this article Bone Density: The Big Dairy Fallacytudy

A recent Havard study of 78,000 nurses found that women who drank more than one glass of milk per day had a 45-percent greater chance of hip fractures compared to those who drank far less. Those who took in the same amount of calcium from nondairy sources saw no such increase, nor a decrease in fractures. 
In Japan, as in many other non-Caucasian populations, dairy intake has traditionally been minimal and calcium intakes have been low - and hip fracture rates are low, but have been growing recently, as is the portion of adults who were raised on dairy.

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1 comment:

  1. Anonymous3:29 PM

    “Three delicious glasses of nonfat or low-fat milk a day is all it takes to get 100 percent of your calcium needs met and 75 percent of your vitamin D and a host of other essential nutrients from high quality protein to potassium, phosphorus, vitamin A and vitamin B12.” In addition, milk is low in sodium and provides a lot of nutrition for its 80 to 120 calories per cup. Milk can also contribute to daily hydration needs – it is made up of about 90 percent water, which is essential to virtually every bodily function. As a bonus, milk is economical. “It’s about 25 cents per cup, which is far less than the majority of new-agey ‘fortified sugar waters’ on the market today.”


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